346 Centre Street

The building at Lot 10, Block 16, Plan 3185 - 346 Centre Street in Shaunavon (pictured above) has been the home of The Shaunavon Standard newspaper since August 1969. Did you know that this building first opened in 1914 as Binkley’s Furniture Store, which also had funeral supplies at the back of the business? Through the years several different businesses operated out of this location. Below is a brief history of the building as compiled by Kathleen East, Grand Coteau Centre Museum volunteer, using information from The Shaunavon Standard newspapers.

March 1914: Work started on Binkley's Furniture Store with funeral supplies at the back - 25ft x 70ft, one storey building. Abrahamson Bros., contractor. The business was operated by Glenn Ray (G.R.) Binkley, an experienced furniture man and funeral director who relocated to Shaunavon from Swift Current. 
May 1914: G.R. Binkley opened his furniture store and funeral home.
March 1914: Work started on Binkley's Furniture Store with funeral supplies at the back - 25ft x 70ft, one storey building. Abrahamson Bros., contractor. The business was operated by Glenn Ray (G.R.) Binkley, an experienced furniture man and funeral director who relocated to Shaunavon from Swift Current. May 1914: G.R. Binkley opened his furniture store and funeral home.
March 1917: Binkley Bros. (Glenn & Manse) purchase the lot and building they are occupying from R.H. Ross and build a 16ft x 24ft addition at the back of Binkley's Furniture Co. Ltd. for a morgue. 
April 1919: Cooperman Furniture Co. takes over Binkley Furniture Store. Manse Binkley retains the undertaking portion and Glenn Binkley moves to a farm.
March 1917: Binkley Bros. (Glenn & Manse) purchase the lot and building they are occupying from R.H. Ross and build a 16ft x 24ft addition at the back of Binkley's Furniture Co. Ltd. for a morgue. April 1919: Cooperman Furniture Co. takes over Binkley Furniture Store. Manse Binkley retains the undertaking portion and Glenn Binkley moves to a farm.

1920-1924

June 1920: Shaunavon Pharmacy opens in Binkley Furniture building, under John Saunderson.
August 1921: Mendels Limited opens in this location. They advertised clothing and dry goods.
January 1922: Gelin Bros. replaces Mendels Ltd. They sell ladies' and gents' furnishings.
November 1922: Gelin Bros. have a closing out sale of all clothing and dry goods.
January 1923: Gelin Bros. premise converted to D’Jazz Billiard Parlors, featuring a large electric sign, cut glass domes and fixtures, modern barber equipment, electric piano, marble display cases. Grand opening held January 21. A fire on January 24 causes $3,350 damage to stock and building. Billiard hall and Binkley Bros undertaking rooms are smoke damaged.
April 1923: Harry Stock and H. Neiman open a barber shop in back of D’Jazz Billiard Parlor.
December 1924: D’Jazz Billiard Parlor has a closing out sale on pipes and tobacco.
March 1928: E. Rousch opens recreation bowling alley, featuring 4 alleys. Rousch was a national trap shooter. May 1929: Art Johnson of Gull Lake purchases E.M. Rousch Bowling Alley. August 1930: Johnson Bowling Alley closes due to financial difficulties - lanes and equipment are purchased and moved to Gull Lake. November 1930: Old bowling alley used for bake sales, auctions, etc.
March 1928: E. Rousch opens recreation bowling alley, featuring 4 alleys. Rousch was a national trap shooter. May 1929: Art Johnson of Gull Lake purchases E.M. Rousch Bowling Alley. August 1930: Johnson Bowling Alley closes due to financial difficulties - lanes and equipment are purchased and moved to Gull Lake. November 1930: Old bowling alley used for bake sales, auctions, etc.
July 1931: Safeway opens with Wilfred Kilburn in charge. The building is owned by Frank Mitchell. It is redecorated and had a canopy put over the front. 
March 1935: Fire at back of building caused considerable damage to local Safeway store and is closed for a week. Overheated stovepipe caused the problem. 
April 1939: Fire at Safeway & Binkley buildings.
July 1931: Safeway opens with Wilfred Kilburn in charge. The building is owned by Frank Mitchell. It is redecorated and had a canopy put over the front. March 1935: Fire at back of building caused considerable damage to local Safeway store and is closed for a week. Overheated stovepipe caused the problem. April 1939: Fire at Safeway & Binkley buildings.
August 1940: Wilfred Kilburn buys out Safeway store and renames it Kilburn’s Groceteria.
February 1945: Gerry Kilburn returns from the war and takes over from his dad.
August 1940: Wilfred Kilburn buys out Safeway store and renames it Kilburn’s Groceteria. February 1945: Gerry Kilburn returns from the war and takes over from his dad.
January 1948: Dave Mitchell Sr. and Edgar Boyle take over Kilburn’s Groceries and rename it Central Groceteria; staff Merle Brown and Bill Hesch.  Edgar Boyle was involved for a brief period only.
July 1954: Central Groceteria has increased shopping area, wider aisles, combination service, new frozen food and display cases.  
January 1967: Dave Mitchell Central Groceteria still in operation with Dave Mitchell Sr. and Dave Mitchell Jr. involved.
September 1967: Mitchells leave this location and open Mitchells Foodmaster on 3rd Ave. W.
January 1948: Dave Mitchell Sr. and Edgar Boyle take over Kilburn’s Groceries and rename it Central Groceteria; staff Merle Brown and Bill Hesch. Edgar Boyle was involved for a brief period only. July 1954: Central Groceteria has increased shopping area, wider aisles, combination service, new frozen food and display cases. January 1967: Dave Mitchell Central Groceteria still in operation with Dave Mitchell Sr. and Dave Mitchell Jr. involved. September 1967: Mitchells leave this location and open Mitchells Foodmaster on 3rd Ave. W.

1968-1969

April 1968: Vaughan’s Sporting Goods store opens in former Mitchell’s Groceteria. It has an extensive stock of sporting goods, giftware and luggage. 
June 1969: Vaughan’s Sporting Goods moved to a new location across the street by July 1st.
August 1969: The Shaunavon Standard Ltd. opens in this building — Herbert Sydney (Syd) Stevens and Jack Robertshaw are proprietors and editors of this local newspaper. They also sell business stationery, Moore business forms, wedding stationery, etc. 
February 1977: Jack Robertshaw is sole publisher of The Shaunavon Standard, after he purchases Syd Stevens’ share.
January 1984: Robert J. and Leslie R. Irvine take over The Shaunavon Standard from Jack and Joan Robertshaw.  
September 1987: Front of The Shaunavon Standard building is redone.
October 1993:Leslie Corrins (formerly Irvine) takes over as publisher of The Shaunavon Standard. Business sells stationery, paper goods, some computer supplies, greeting cards, fudge, and giftware.
August 1969: The Shaunavon Standard Ltd. opens in this building — Herbert Sydney (Syd) Stevens and Jack Robertshaw are proprietors and editors of this local newspaper. They also sell business stationery, Moore business forms, wedding stationery, etc. February 1977: Jack Robertshaw is sole publisher of The Shaunavon Standard, after he purchases Syd Stevens’ share. January 1984: Robert J. and Leslie R. Irvine take over The Shaunavon Standard from Jack and Joan Robertshaw. September 1987: Front of The Shaunavon Standard building is redone. October 1993:Leslie Corrins (formerly Irvine) takes over as publisher of The Shaunavon Standard. Business sells stationery, paper goods, some computer supplies, greeting cards, fudge, and giftware.
July 1996: Lloyd Garthus, contractor, renovated front of The Shaunavon Standard building.
March 2006: The Shaunavon Standard, along with two Maple Creek newspapers, was bought out by Alberta Newspaper Group, Inc. The business continues to operate from this location.
July 1996: Lloyd Garthus, contractor, renovated front of The Shaunavon Standard building. March 2006: The Shaunavon Standard, along with two Maple Creek newspapers, was bought out by Alberta Newspaper Group, Inc. The business continues to operate from this location.

Everyone has a story to share...

The Grand Coteau Heritage & Cultural Centre is always looking to grow our collection of stories, anecdotes, photos, and artifacts related to the heritage of Shaunavon and area.

We invite community members - past and present - to consider contributing your memories, your photographs, your tangible items of Shaunavon significance to our Museum collection so that they may be preserved and shared. For more information please contact Museum staff by visiting us at 440 Centre Street, phoning us at 306-297-3882, or sending us an email at heritagegchcc@sasktel.net.

"Our heritage is our inheritance - what the past has conceded to us, what we value in the present and what we choose to preserve for future generations."

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